Assistive Device devices are equipment that used to improve function in persons with disabilities. Assistive Technology describes devices that help children move more easily and communicate successfully at home, at school and in community with family and friends. These are devices that assist a child to overcome physical and communication limitations.

      There are a number of devices that help children stand straight and walk, such as postural supports or seating systems, open front-walkers, quadrapedal canes. It can also include more high tech equipment like customized wheelchairs and electric wheelchairs that let children move more freely.

      As individuals mature, they may require support services such as personal assistance services, continuing therapy, educational and vocational training, independent living services, counseling, transportation, recreation/leisure programs, and employment opportunities, all essential to the developing adult.

      Simple technology can be used to assist with skills (modified eating utensils). Complex technology can substitute or replace abilities that do not exist (power chairs for walking, electronic speech aids for talking). Learning to use the equipment may include education from a therapist or teacher, depending on the technology.

      A variety of orthotics, braces or splints, are recommended by doctors and physiotherapist for your child to correct muscle abnormalities. These may be used on your child’s legs, arms, hands or trunk. Some of these supports are used to help function, such as improved walking, sitting or standing. The purpose of other types of orthotics is for additional stretching or positioning of a joint.

Assistive Technology Options

  • Braces (orthotics) and Splints
  • Mobility Devices
  • Canes
  • Walkers
  • Wheelchairs: manual or powered
  • Powered scooters
  • Positioning Devices
  • Seats
  • Standers
  • Sidelyers
  • Wedges
  • Adapted eating equipment
  • Speech aids
  • Computer software or hardware
  • Vision aids (magnifiers, large text print books)
  • Hearing aids (telephone amplifiers)